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Wages for Housework Campaign

Please join us for a special screening of All Work and No Pay & Women of the Rhondda

Crossroads Women’s Centre present

All Work and No Pay &
Women of the Rhondda

Sat 19 Oct 2019 / 2-4pm

LUX, Waterlow Park Centre, Dartmouth Park Hill, London, N19 5JF
Booking free via Eventbrite

Book online

As part of our current exhibition All You Need’s An Excuse, please join us for a special screening of a recent acquisition by the London Community Video Archive (LCVA), All Work and No Paymade in 1975 by the Power of Women Collective and Wages for Housework Campaign, and broadcast in 1976 by the community access unit for the BBC, Open Door. The programme provided much-needed airtime where the demand for wages for housework could be put forward. The video shows meetings and interviews with groups in different countries developing campaign strategies and women of different races and nationalities sharing their experiences.

The screening will be introduced by women from the Global Women’s Strike, based at the Crossroads Women’s Centre in Kentish Town. GWS have also chosen to screen Women of the Rhondda (1973) made collectively by Esther Ronay, Mary Kelly, Mary Capps, Humphrey Trevelyan, Margaret Dickinson, Brigid Seagrave and Susan Shapiro. Distributed by Cinenova.

The event is free and all are welcome. Refreshments will be provided.

This project is supported by the BFI Film Audience Network as part of Changing Times: Shifting Ground.

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Selma James Wages for Housework Campaign

Selma James in Hunger Magazine

Selma James in Hunger Magazine
“READ THE MOST INSPIRING QUOTES FROM THE WOMEN OF HUNGER 14”

“In the recent months what has happened is that women in prominent positions have complained about what they suffer, and that has been very useful. It can be even more useful when they include the rest of us in their complaint. You can move high up in society but you still suffer from injustices because the rest of us do. You can’t escape your identification with those down below you – you get it because we get it. It’s systemic. The entire system has to change before everybody will be free.”

http://www.hungertv.com/feature/read-the-most-inspiring-quotes-from-the-women-of-hunger-14/?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_campaign=Echobox&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#link_time=1520506623

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Selma James Wages for Housework Campaign

Equal Pay article by Selma James for What Women Want report

WHAT WOMEN WANT 2.0

EQUAL PAY: SELMA JAMES
Co-ordinator of the Global Women’s Strike and author of Sex, Race & Class – The Perspective of Winning

“[I want] wages for housework. Equal pay. Safety from violence and bullying.”

Equal pay was a defining theme in the responses to the What Women Want 2.0 survey, showing that, despite commitments from companies and government, little progress has been made.

But change is coming. Women are making headlines by confronting employers who take advantage, sexually and with gross pay differentials! Even women who rose from the ranks are speaking out, acknowledging that they are not immune from sexist discrimination; they are making a way for the rest of us to be heard – finally.

Pay is social power; it determines how we live, with whom and on what terms. I once worked in a tobacco warehouse

when women on the assembly line were about to get equal pay with men who shifted stock. In our excitement, one woman proclaimed: “From now on I’m paying half the mortgage, and that’ll change everything between us!”

Of course, women want jobs we enjoy, but most of us go out to work because we have to.

Wages measure the value of our time – which happens to be our life. When our wages are lower than men’s, we are disrespected and undermined. In the UK, the pay gap hovers around 19.2%.

Inequality of income is inseparable from the unpaid caring work most women do at home, especially if we are mothers. In 2006, Baroness Alison Wolf showed how different sectors of women are affected by this. She compared women’s incomes with the incomes of their male partners over a lifetime. A woman graduate born in 1970 with two children can expect lifetime earnings that are 88% of her male partner; 57% for women with middle level qualifications; and 34% for women without formal qualifications.

These income gaps reflect part-time work and career breaks for the 80% of UK women who are mothers. It’s like an employment tax on motherhood, felt most heavily by women who have least. But even non-mothers are expected to put up with less. Employers know what they can get away with in terms of discrimination,  not only on grounds of gender but also of race, age, disability and immigration status.

A century ago, suffragette MP Eleanor Rathbone was outraged that mothers who made society were denied “any share in its wealth”.  She spent her life campaigning for Family Allowance, introduced in 1946, the first act of the welfare state. She wanted this income to give mothers a level playing field to negotiate equal pay. And in 1968, the strike of the Ford Dagenham women established “comparable worth” – equal pay for work of equal value – and won us the 1970 Equal Pay Act. But jobs like caring, cooking, cleaning remained “women’s work” – undervalued and underpaid. Then the austerity cuts, 86% of which fell on women, created an employers’ market and women’s power to refuse even barbaric zero-hours contracts almost evaporated.

Now the struggle has resumed, everywhere, and it increasingly focuses on caring. In Ireland, an employment tribunal ruled that “caring responsibilities” had been used to discriminate against women academics. In Germany, thousands of metal workers downed tools for a 28-hour working week if they needed to care for children or ageing parents. “We want employers to recognise that traditional gender roles in modern families are changing, and we want workers to have the chance to do work that is important to society,” said a union spokesperson.

Paid time to care is on the agenda. Just when new technology threatens to massively cut jobs, the status of caring is rising. We might reconsider Virginia Woolf’s call for “a living wage for mothers”, updated to include all carers and all genders. What an opportunity!

https://pixeldot.attach.io/HySGcKD5f

Global Women’s Strike

http://www.facebook.com/GlobalWomensStrike

GWS@GlobalWomenStrike.net

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Wages for Housework Campaign

Women and Sustainable Development

Para 247 of the Platform for Action agreed at the UN Forth World Conference on Women, Beijing 1995. The fact that environmental degradation results in more work for women, and that eradicating poverty is indispensable to sustainable development, were included after lobbying by the International Women Count Network. The IWCN – with the support of 1,200 Non-Governmental Organizations worldwide – also won a commitment in the Platform for Action to measure and value unwaged work.

The International Women Count Network – organizations and individuals who support measuring and valuing unwaged in satellite accounts of the GDP – in Barbados, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Greece, Guyana, India, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands, The Philippines, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago, UK, USA. Co-ordinated by the International Wages for Housework Campaign and International Black Women for Wages for Housework. 

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Wages for Housework Campaign

Counting women’s unwaged work: an anti-racist measure

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Wages for Housework Campaign

Women Count, Count Women’s Work

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Wages for Housework Campaign

Women Celebrate New Recognition of Unpaid Work, Beijing Watch

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Wages for Housework Campaign

Governments agree to measure and value unwaged work

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Wages for Housework Campaign

Measuring and valuing unwaged work. Women Count, count women’s work

The International Women Count Network, with the support of 1,200 Non-Governmental Organizations worldwide, won these historic decisions at the UN Forth World Conference of Women (Platform for Action, Beijing 1995). They are now being implemented in a number of countries.

The International Women Count Network campaigns for governments to measure and value unwaged (“unremunerated” work in official accounts. The Network extends to Barbados, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Greece, Guyana, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, Pakistan, Peru, The Philippines, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Trinidad & Tobago, UK, USA. Co-ordinated by the International Wages for Housework Campaign and International Black Women for Wages for Housework.

 

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Wages for Housework Campaign

Trinidad and Tobago Wages for Housework speech